UK accused of trying to colonize Somalia

Posted on 19/02/2012

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Somalia’s al-Shabab militants have considered British government’s plans to address the mounting crises in the African nation as “another attempt to colonize Somalia.”

Prime Minister David Cameron will lead London Conference on Somalia on February 23, to introduce fresh steps to fight terrorism in the war-torn country. Envoys from 50 nations– including the US, Ethiopia and Uganda who are launching drone attacks on Somalia– will attend the conference.

Meanwhile, al-Shebab spokesman Sheikh Ali Mohamud Rage criticized the London Conference, stressing the move demonstrated the “imperious nature” of the UK government, aiming to interfere in Somalia’s affairs to revive “a hopeless dream of a British Empire.”

“Britain must understand that the Muslims have long rejected British imperialism, and the futility of their renewed attempt is all too obvious,” Rage said in a message posted on Twitter.

Somalia has faced war and lawlessness since 1991, when warlords overthrew the administration of former junta chief Mohamed Siad Barre.

Earlier this month, UK Foreign Secretary William Hague visited the capital Mogadishu and revealed that Britain will try to bring stability in the war-torn country, since “Somalia’s stability will be vital for the security of UK.”

Hague also appointed Matt Baugh as UK’s first ambassador to Somalia in 21 years.

Analysts cast doubt on the result of the London Conference this month, believing the conference should be held inside Somalia in order to include the voices of all Somalis.

Some anti-war critics insist that Britain’s move to appoint an ambassador and host an international conference over the Horn of Africa nation is a prelude to impose a humanitarian intervention in the country, as it has immense oil and gas reserves and some other natural resources like Uranium, iron and zinc. 

Al-Shabab fighters have been fighting to oust the Western-backed transitional government in Mogadishu, where the government props up by a 10,000-strong African Union force from Uganda, Burundi, and Djibouti.

Source: PressTV 14.02.2012